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The new $100 Xbox Adaptive Controller lets you plug in the gadgets you need to get back in the game.

 

Just in time for Global Accessibility Awareness Day, Microsoft decided to step up their game and make Xbox and PC gaming a little more accessible to gamers of all abilities.

The new adaptive controller steers away from conventional two-handed controllers, and mimics a lap pad. Also, it lacks A/B/Y/X buttons, a d-pad, and triggers on the back. The controller offers two large buttons, and two USB ports. It also has a horde of 3.5 mm accessibility ports on the back, and mounting spots to attach it to a wheelchair.

What makes this controller unique is those accessibility ports. These are universal across all accessibility peripherals, and allows the user to customize their experience to their needs. A user can add accessories such as bite switches, modified joysticks, or even foot pedals. It even has a headset jack, so you can trash talk, err…encourage…your teammates as usual.

Each of those ports on the back correlate with a traditional, labeled, controller button. This easy setup offers customization to a users liking. Everything a traditional remote can do, this can do just as well.

Navin Kumar, director of product marketing for Xbox accessories is quoted as saying, “in the U.S. it is estimated that 14% of Xbox One gamers have a temporary mobility limitation and that 8% of gamers have a permanent mobility limitation [and] we felt like we needed to do more for this audience”.

To ensure that Microsoft delivered a quality product, they partnered and received feedback from organizations such as: The Cerebral Palsy Foundation, Warfighter Engaged, The Able Gamers Charity, Craig Hospital, and Special Effect. In addition, gamers with disabilities gave positive feedback about the product. It has received rave reviews across the board.

Microsoft’s Adaptive Controller is set to go on sale at the end of this year.

We’re excited to see this option become available for users with disabilities. What other sorts of adaptive hardware would you like to see produced? Let us know in the comments!