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Aero #1 - Marvel Comics
This is how she reacts when she can't get into Comic-Con.

AFTER A JULY 4 DELAY, WE ARE BACK WITH NEW COMIC REVIEWS!

After spending some time at Anime Expo and seeing Spider-Man: Far From Home, we have more of the latest comics for review!

Adventures of the Super Sons #12 - DC Comics
DC Comics

ADVENTURES OF THE SUPER SONS #12
DC Comics

Writers: Peter J. Tomasi
Artist: Carlo Barberi
Cover Price:  $3.99

This is a comic that needs you to be involved in the DC Universe to enjoy all of it.

Peter Tomasi’s take on the sons of DC’s biggest superheros has kept its buddy-movie feel.  Their conflicting personalities compliment and antagonize each other so well, it’s hilarious.  I am really surprised Warner Brothers hasn’t tried to make this a cartoon yet.  Meanwhile, the overall issue is well-paced.  However, everything hinges on a McGuffin that must be more important in terms of DC history.  I’m not familiar with it, so it hamstrung my reading experience.  Also, this series’ final issue includes a wish-it-away ending.  I really don’t like those.

Adventures of the Super Sons #12 - DC Comics
Adventures of the Super Sons #12 – DC Comics

The art by Carlo Barberi has most of what you need to add to this story.  His style is dynamic and fluid.  He uses strong outer lines and a combination of solid blacks and scratch lines to create very textured gradients.  This gives images a great 3D feel without being busy.  There is just enough detail to get Barberi’s images across.  Moreover, Barberi does a great job of capturing the energy of youth without making it feel juvenile.

This comic has been fun for the most part, however the ending isn’t terribly accessible to casual readers.

Aero #1 - Marvel Comics
Marvel Comics

AERO #1
Marvel Comics

Writers: Zhou Liefen (adapted by Greg Pak)
Artist: Keng
Cover Price:  $3.99

I did not expect to enjoy this comic so much.

Aero is originally written by Zhou Liefen.  Greg Pak handles the English adaption.  The overall story is a bit mysterious as far as Aero’s origin.  However, it quickly shows you the character’s power and personal life.  This makes the character interesting without getting mired in a long arc.  Meanwhile, Aero herself is a professional, confident woman that doesn’t need to be cruel.  You can see some of the moments where the Chinese and American cultures may clash, although they are handled with an unusually deft hand.

Aero #1 - Marvel Comics
Aero #1 – Marvel Comics

The art by Keng is beautiful.  It does have faults.  The detail in the comic is very limited.  Additionally, character faces can be a bit flat.  Meanwhile, this comic has a strong manhua style that has vibrant motion.  The characters are very expressive.  On top of that, Keng has a graceful effect for Aero’s powers.  It has a subtlety that can often be missing from other wind-powered characters in Marvel.

While the villain(s) of the issue are kind of hard to parse out, this issue is a great primer to a character that could use more exposure.  Based on this issue, great things are going to come from this series.

No One Left to Fight #1 - Dark Horse Comics
Dark Horse Comics

NO ONE LEFT TO FIGHT #1
Dark Horse Comics

Writers: Aubrey Sitterson
Artist: Fico Ossio
Cover Price:  $3.99

What happens when the hero has vanquished his last foe?  This is a question DragonBall will never answer, but this comic will try to.

The story by Aubrey Sitterson is rather novel.  With the hero living in a post-threat world, we are trying to see what he does now.  Meanwhile, his characters seem to have parallels to a certain Saiyan and his friend.  However, they are different enough to be their own story.  It’s like comparing DragonBall and Naruto.  Both are very similar, although they are different enough to enjoy them separately.  The characters appear to have nuance, but it is too early to tell.  The script itself is an entertaining and airy.

No One Left to Fight #1 - Dark Horse Comics
No One Left to Fight #1 – Dark Horse Comics

Fico Ossio may be a new unsung star of comics.  His characters immediately stand out for the amount of fine detail in them.  Each character has a set of unique details that sets them apart.  Additionally, they are very expressive.  The characters’ emotions are readily apparent on every panel.  The line-work is universally thin, although, again, the amount of detail is remarkable.  On top of all of that, the action is superb.  Each bit of action has terrific impact behind it.  The punches feel fast and damaging.  Visually, this is A+ material.

I am not all-together sure about the story.  However, this is a great start.  I want to see how this series develops.  Most comics are built on the hero trying to stop the bad guy and save the world.  The first issue of this comic is a hero trying to live after the last bad guy has been beaten.  This makes for an interesting character-driven story.

The Wild Storm #24 - DC Comics
DC Comics

PICK OF THE WEEK
THE WILD STORM #24
Image Comics

Writers: Warren Ellis
Artist: Jon Davis-Hunt
Cover Price:  $3.99

When you end your story, you want the ending to be this big.

Warren Ellis started the Wild Storm with a 24-issue plan, and this ending has been worth the journey.  The story went full speed from the first page to the last and has a big-event feel to this retelling of the Wildstorm universe.  It is light on character moments.  This is because it is featuring payoffs to series-long stories.  This issue will not be accessible to new readers.  It requires you to know most of what has come before to make any real sense.

The Wild Storm #24 - DC Comics
The Wild Storm #24 – DC Comics

Jon Davis-Hunt’s art seems a little rushed in this issue.  He may have lost pace with this two-year story.  His detail is sparse and his action has lost some of its fluidity.  While everyone is recognizable, they just feel kind of static.  Meanwhile, his backgrounds are unusually detailed.  They don’t stand out from the characters, although they bring the locations into just enough focus to give you a feel of the world.

This series has been above-average throughout its run.  It makes the Wildstorm universe into a place where politics and espionage rule the day.  Some super-powered people are pawns while others are independent agents.  Versions of the Justice League characters are present in this universe via the Michael Cray tie-ins and they are very subverted.

The Wild Storm #24 - DC Comics
The Wild Storm #24 – DC Comics

This issue is a great ending.  It ties up a lot of stories while leaving room for new beginnings and changes the status quo.  You won’t understand anything if you drop in here.  Start from issue #1 and… seriously… READ ALL OF IT.

Have you read any of this week’s comics?  Let us know in the comments below!  In the meantime, here is a link to the latest episode of our comic book podcast, the Part-Time Henchmen!

Anime Expo 2019 – A Review

COMIC REVIEWS FOR 6/26/19